Campaigns against Smart Meters

There are a small number of campaigns against Smart Meters. Each campaign tends to focus on one particular reason to be against Smart Meters, let's look at the main reasons.

  • Radio waves: Some campaigns suggest that Smart Meters emit harmful radio waves. This could be relevant to you if you are one of the rare people who are sensitive to radio frequencies and have had to remove mobile telephones, and wireless devices from your home, otherwise there is no additional risk from Smart Meters.

  • Information Privacy: Some campaigns suggest that the data collected from Smart Meters could be used for unauthorised purposes. Most data collected will be for meter readings, a Smart meter can collect meters readings frequently, say every 30 minutes, for sending back to your energy supplier. With such frequent readings there are concerns that someone could work out when you are away from home or work out what you are doing. Firstly no one other than the supplier can see your data unless you give permission and you can ask your energy supplier to only collect meter reading data at a particular frequency. For example if you are not on a complex product and don't want to observe the pattern of your own consumption, then you can ask your supplier to only collect data on a monthly basis. Many people share much more sensitive data these days through social web sites so this seems a small concern.

  • Economic Sense: Does it make economic sense to install Smart Meters; this is a good challenge as the government's own business case is weak. The main benefit is the benefit to consumers reducing their consumption as they will have better visibility of their usage and cost position. Surveys testing the assumption have varied, many show that consumer's consumption reduces initially and then goes back up as the novelty factor of a Smart meter and In Home Display wears off. Ironically the government have also forced suppliers to offer a limited number of simple products which greatly reduces supplier's scope to use Smart Meters. One area where Smart Meters will offer customer an advantage through more flexibility is for Pre-payment products or Pay As You Go. Overall though the business case is very weak unless the government remove some of the restrictions they have put on suppliers to use all the features of Smart Meters.

Questions & Answers


Can I refuse to have a smart meter installed?
Yes. You are under no obligation to have a smart meter installed in your home. You can discuss any concerns you have about smart meters with your supplier. Many energy companies have dedicated teams to handle questions about the technology and the installation process.

Are smart meters safe?
Yes. DECC (Department of Energy and Climate Change) have stated that all smart meters are subject to the same safety regulations and testing of any in-home technological devices, including baby monitors and mobile phones.

Can my supply be turned off remotely?
Smart meters have the facility to remotely disconnect and reconnect both the electricity and gas supply. However most suppliers seem to have decided it is too dangerous to remotely disconnect or reconnect, as in the case of disconnection they cannot always be sure that the customer isn't relying on a supply for serious health reasons and in the case of reconnection the customer may have left a cooker on for example.

What will energy companies do with the information they collect about my energy consumption?
Under Ofgem codes published July 2013, you can dictate how much data your energy supplier can retrieve from your smart meter and whether your supplier can share that info with third parties. You can also decide whether or not your supplier can use that information for marketing purposes.

Can I look at my energy usage on the internet?
You will be able to view your energy usage on the internet at some stage. Suppliers are all working on new systems to make this possible.

Why are smart meters controversial?
Whilst earlier conversations about smart meters focused on safety (which you can read more about in Campaigns Against), more recent criticisms have sprung from how the government and suppliers are handling the roll-out. From cost to customer communication, the plan to get a smart meter into every home by 2020 has been a bumpy ride so far. In early 2014, EDF Energy, ScottishPower and npower called for a review of the roll-out, stating the cost to customers would be £1.8 billion. This, they said, was due to the "ambitious" deadline of every household in four years and the cost of the In Home Displays. The cost is ultimately paid by customers through measures on their energy bills. Instead, suppliers proposed, customers could link up their smart meter to their smartphone or tablet to save cost. In 2013, independent research commissioned by uSwitch found that 55% of us were "in the dark" about smart meters. That meant households did not understand what smart meters did and how they could benefit them. However, later studies of those with actual smart meters in their homes enjoyed more accurate billing and were more satisfied with their providers.

How much will a smart meter cost me?
Your supplier will install your smart meter for free under the national upgrade programme set to begin in 2015. All households currently pay for the cost of their meters and required maintenance as part of their energy bills, this will be the same with smart meters. The overall cost is estimated to be £11 billion, however the estimated savings are expected to be £17 billion. So even after the investment of installing smart meters for everyone, there should be a national saving of £6 billion by 2030.

How much is this all costing?
The total cost is estimated to be £11 billion, however the estimated savings are expected to be £17 billion. So even after the investment of installing smart meters for everyone, there should be a national saving of £6 billion by 2030.